J&J Incurs Heavy Loss following Risperdal Drug Controversy

Risperdal drug

The long term use of Risperdal drug has brought significant visual side effects in individuals consuming the medicine. The situation itself has raised huge questions on the credibility of the drug’s usage with many unheard cases that remain pending in the US courts.

The atypical antipsychotic medicine used for treating schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and irritability associated with autism seems to be at a higher risk of being at its closure by the medical facility.

A research revealed that side effects of the drug varied from movement problems, sleepiness, dizziness, trouble seeing, constipation, and increased weight to the permanent movement disorder tardive dyskinesia, as well as neuroleptic malignant syndrome, while increasing the risk of death in older people.

A recent Risperdal drug case handled by the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas ruled that Johnson & Johnson will have to pay $8 billion in the case filed by Nicholas Murray. This is because the company failed to warn that young men using its antipsychotic Risperdal drug could grow breasts said the Philadelphian jury on Tuesday.

Murray, who previously won $680,000 over his claims will now be getting more for the punitive damages from the drug. It is not the first time that J&J has to pay for the damages for allowing legal or illegal marketing of a controversial drug with huge side-effects.

Since 2012, various lawsuits have been filed against Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. with the accusation of downplaying multiple risk associated with Risperdal Drug. In August 2012, J&J agreed to pay $181 million to 36 US states in order to settle claims of having promoted risperidone for off-label uses including for dementia, anger management, and anxiety.  

A year later, it was fined $2.2 billion for illegally marketing risperidone for use in people with dementia. By July 2016, the Philadelphian court received nearly 1500 cases with people complaining that Risperdal drug consumption led to breast growth in them. There was a $70 million verdict against J&J in November 2016.

Even after continued complaints, no specific steps have been taken to halt the use of the controversial drug. The critics have continuously accused Johnson & Johnson and (subsidiary) Janssen for choosing profits and billions over patients.

Earlier in August, the American multinational company was held accountable for the opioid crisis in Oklahoma and was hit hard by a US state judge’s landmark ruling as the company carried out years-long marketing campaign and minimized the addictive painkillers’ risks. This gave rise to Oklahoma’s opioid addiction crisis.

Against the recent accusations of contributing to the usage of Risperdal drug, J&J said that the award was “grossly disproportionate with the initial compensatory award in this case, and the company is confident it will be overturned.” It added that the jury in the case had not been allowed to hear evidence of Risperdal’s benefits.

Amid the conflicts, J&J should take the verdict as a sign of warning that the promotion of Risperdal drug could bring more damages for the company and its reputation in future although the pending cases itself shows the minimal chances of the company’s survival financially.

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